Access vba current recordset does not support updating

So if you later split your database so the tables are attached, the code fails when you use a method that no longer applies. Dynaset guarantees your code will work for all queries and tables, local and attached.

Example: Using any of the Move methods (Move First, Move Last, Move Next, or Move Previous) causes an error if the recordset has no records. Either of these approaches works: For recordsets based on queries, SQL statements, and attached tables, the Record Count property returns the number of records accessed so far.

This is causing a some strange behavior: As I enter a subform, I get a no current record error. ; .recordcount = 1 But when I ask for a .recordset.field value I get "no current record" The form worked fine when I used the recordset.findfirst method to get to the client I want, but I was having network issues, so I wanted to limit the number of records across the wire. This is causing a some strange behavior: As I enter a subform, I get a no current record error. ; .recordcount = 1 But when I ask for a .recordset.field value I get "no current record" The form worked fine when I used the recordset.findfirst method to get to the client I want, but I was having network issues, so I wanted to limit the number of records across the wire. the record has not finished loading at the moment when you try to read it.) Or is might be that the form's Recordset is flakey, and there is a better way to do what you want.

After Update event to get to a single client record. After Update event to get to a single client record.

This is strange to me because: I can see the record contents displayed on the form, and debug.printing them gets me the values. This is strange to me because: I can see the record contents displayed on the form, and debug.printing them gets me the values.

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Don't Move Last unless you really need to: this will be slow with a large recordset or a recordset drawn across a network.DAO is the native Access library (what Access itself uses), whereas ADO is a more generic library (now superseded by the vastly different ADO.NET library.) Different versions of Access default to different libraries.The hidden structure makes it harder to manage them, harder to apply criteria, harder to pass arguments, harder to determine the delimiters to use for a field, and harder to upsize since other databases like SQL Server don't use these complex types.

Eschewing the complex data types is a perfectly valid choice if you only deal with databases you created, but if you support end users or write generic utilities to work with any Access tables, you must learn to handle them.Your program then fails, or returns inaccurate results.

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